Mornings In Casinos is the Best for Me

Here’s a retread, one of my first posts – updated.  It was true then, and it’s true now. I just want to reflect on why I like mornings for gambling, or at casinos in general. I can hear Linus singing “Happiness” at the end of the first Peanuts Casino animation, coming soon.  “Mornings In Casinos is the Best for Me…..”

serenity in an empty casino😊

  • First and foremost – There’s nobody there!  I’m talking 6:00 am. I mean, to hop to any machine, play a little BJ, hit a whole row of Video Poker – it’s just the best. And the quiet is just surreal.  The few people who are there either just got up or are looking for breakfast somewhere – or asleep on a machine!
  • Beverage service – nothing like black coffee and all the water you want – and not having to wait long to get it.
  • Smoke – you can just feel the last remnant of it being cleared before the weekend crowds appear.  It’s the crispest air you’ll find at a casino (if anyone can refer to casino air as crisp?)
  • Cleanliness – Machines are wiped down, and there aren’t as many machines to sit down at where there are ashes all over and/or drink glasses not picked up.
  • If it’s a local casino, I get to to leave before the buses and weekend crowds arrive, and I still have the rest of the day to myself.
  • Two additions from our friend Mike T. – 1) No machine hoggers, and 2) not a lot of machine slappers…..if any!

Viva Las Vegas in the Morning

  • It’s also a great time to people watch the few people up.  Ah, that walk of shame and the business girls parade after their night shift.
  • The action is still going, but still not busy.
  • A healthy walk outside in the morning to start your day. We visit usually in July and August and it gets hot!  A walk down Las Vegas Boulevard without mosiers, huskers and time share hawkers is devine in the cool of the morning.

Serenity now? Yes, in the morning. Keep Calm and Gamble in the morning.

Related NETG Post – Two Days in Las Vegas – Idle Thoughts

 

That’s all for now.

 

Binbin

When Video Poker Machines Hesitate – What Does It Mean?

Royal Flush – almost!

We have all been there – those of us who play Video Poker and Slots.  You’re playing along, things are going well, and then it happens……the machine pause for a moment!  What does it mean?  Was I winning too much?  Did someone in the “Office Upstairs” turn on that switch that changes winning into losing?  Conspiracy thoughts abound.

Well, you know what it means?  NOTHING!  At least it isn’t a reaction to ant success you’ve had previously.

Just Catching up to itself

Yes, we think it might have stopped our winning momentum, or the rhythmic luck we had our mojo in, but nope – it doesn’t have a clue how much you were winning or how your mojo was – it’s a machine and it doesn’t have the consciousness or emotion to care!

A 1980 IGT Video Poker machine.

So, what DOES IT MEAN? Well, when Video Poker Machines Hesitate – especially certain generations of Video Poker machine manufactured by IGT – they do so often to do it’s accounting.  In other words, the counting of hands played, coin in & coin out, for example, are kept in short term memory.  On the IGT VP machines, for example, every 100 hands, it is downloaded into long-term memory, much like your computer does at times.  The more games and denominations on a single terminal, the longer it may take – a single game with a single denomination would be barely noticed.

You will find fewer and fewer machines with that hesitation these days, due to better software upgrades. But when Video Poker Machines Hesitate admittedly, it’s is frustrating.

Of course we, as human beings, may notice it happen when we are winning, and shortly after we start losing.  “They must have known I was winning!!!!” you might yell.  But, seriously, nothing could be farther from the truth.

Related Post – The History of Video Poker

Related NETG Post – Video Poker Bars – 6 Considerations for a Great Experience

That’s all for now.

Binbin

Charitable Gaming in New Hampshire and Vermont

Charitable Gaming in New England varies by state. Here is a brief report on Charitable Gaming in New Hampshire and Vermont. Charity gambling is a “form of incentivized giving.” The intentions are honorable. Simply said, it’s a chance for a charity group to oversee gambling activities, rather than a municipality or private casino. Many states offer usual casino games with the proceeds used to further its charity’s financial duties.

New Hampshire

Rockingham Poker Room, New Hampshire

Texas Hold ’em at Rockingham Poker Room, New Hampshire

Charitable gaming in New Hampshire includes poker, bingo, Lucky 7, raffles, games of chance and card rooms. The only form of legal electronic bingo gaming is handheld electronic bingo cards. Bingo, originally “beano,” has been legal in New Hampshire since 1949. In addition, New Hampshire approved games of chance in 1977. According to Casino City,   “In 2014, the governor signed a bill into law that created more oversight for the charitable gaming industry, which was estimated to produce $75 million in bets annually. The law requires the Attorney General’s office to conduct background checks on operators and limits fees operators can charge charities. At least 35% of charitable gaming profits must go to charities, under the law. In July 2018, lawmakers increased the maximum bet allowed at charitable casinos from $4 to $10.”

Vermont

The Green Mountain state brings thoughts of maple syrup, dairy cows and Ben & Jerry’s – not gambling.  Charitable Gaming in New Hampshire and Vermont ignores gambling around them. While surrounded by states and Canada that offer commercial and tribal gambling, Vermont has stayed away. The Vermont lottery is the main form of betting inside state lines. Charitable gambling is the only legal poker game in the state. Unfortunately, strict conditions exist for poker. To be considered legal, charities must receive the entire proceeds of the game.

According to RealMoney.com, Vermont allows Charitable gambling under strict conditions. “If the entire proceeds of a game are going to a charity, it is probably legal. Vermont has a special exception or charity bingo games that allow the handing out of small prizes. Raffles are also explicitly allowed. Furthermore, Vermont explicitly allows Vegas Nights and Poker Nights.  The minimum age for all participants is 18, and the host of the event can’t be earning any profit in the role as host.”

So there you have it. We hear about Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island constantly – Maine?, not so much. Gambling is alive and well – even in those New England states considered “non-gaming.”
Binbin
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